Climate change: The impact on health

The consensus among scientists is that we are in an era of global heating and extreme weather events, primarily due to the devastating effects of human action on the environment. Why are researchers concerned, and what are the implications for health?

The Lancet Countdown team is a group of over 120 leading experts on climate, public health, economy, and political science — among others — who have committed to monitoring climate change, particularly its impact on global health.

Since 2015, the year of the Paris Agreement, the experts affiliated with the Lancet Countdown commission have published yearly reports assessing this situation and keeping signatory governments and decision-makers accountable for the commitments they have taken on following the Agreement.

The latest report, which appeared in The Lancet in October 2021, records “deepening inequities” across all regions as global heating remains a concern. The report discusses the impact of climate change in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, and it emphasizes the concern caused by extreme heat events and related natural disasters that have occurred over the past 2 years.

Among the issues outlined in the Lancet Countdown report 2021, there is the impact of climate change on the livelihood of communities around the world, its direct and indirect effect on mental and physical health, and the way in which it contributes to the spread of infectious diseases.

These findings largely coincide with those outlined by another set of landmark reports on climate change — those of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

According to the IPCC 2022 reports, at present, extreme weather events caused by human action are surpassing the resilience of some ecological and human systems, sometimes with irreversible effects.

The reports show that weather extremes related to climate change have affected the productivity of various food sectors — including agricultural, forestry, and fishery sectors — around the world, thus exacerbating food insecurity.

They also emphasize the impact of climate change on mental health, and the ways in which it contributes to the spread of vector-borne communicable diseases.

In our latest installment of the In Conversation podcast, we discuss these aspects at length with two key experts. One of them is Prof. David Pencheon, honorary professor of health and sustainable development at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom, and founder of the Sustainable Development Unit for National Health Services England and Public Health England.

Our other interviewee is Dr. Marina Romanello, a research fellow at the University College London Institute for Global Health, research director of the Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change, and one of the co-authors of the latest Lancet Countdown reports.

You can listen to our podcast in full below, or on your preferred streaming platform.

According to the Lancet Countdown report 2021, “[t]he world is now 1.2 [degrees Celsius] warmer than in the pre-industrial period (1850–1900),” with the past few years recorded as the hottest yet — 2016 has seen the highest levels of heat around the world.

The

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The 7 Sins Slowing The Pace Of Change In Healthcare Organizations

When I was an undergraduate college student, I was certain by my professors of healthcare coverage that the remedy to what ails American healthcare—unequal obtain, severe versions in high-quality, higher expenses and disparities in outcomes—lay in clever policymaking. We will need health care guidelines that help the right items to occur to clients more normally than not, I was taught.

Much more than a ten years immediately after the passage of the Very affordable Care Act and the HITECH Act, I am considerably less certain of the certitude of this very well-intentioned teaching than at any time. Both pieces of laws and the polices that ensued from them had been superb in their intent but incomplete in their genuine-environment execution. Possessing spent my career throughout all sectors of healthcare—government, health care supply, payer side, prescription drugs, and frontline care provision—I have appear to believe that what stops us from addressing our health care complications is not a absence of great policymaking.

No, the enemy is us.

Really don’t get me mistaken. There are a lot of incredibly good and actually focused individuals doing the job in all sectors of health care. But a lot more often than not, their very good intentions are stymied as they tumble prey to these “Seven Sins That Slow the Tempo of Adjust in Healthcare Businesses.”

1) Chance aversion and worry—Over and over once more we see organizations capable of producing significant bets (i.e. organizations with major balance sheets) quit brief of employing individuals big bets simply because of endemic threat-aversion and worry of the unfamiliar. We speak a large amount about benefit-primarily based care, emerging tech, and startups intent on disrupting the business, but the truth is that if the 800-pound gorillas in healthcare are not inclined to experiment, try out out news things—and, sure, fail—then what hope is there for other organizations with considerably less potential to weather setbacks?

2) Gradual-strolling progress. For yrs, lots of people—including myself—speculated that electronic wellbeing would grow to be a dominant method of healthcare supply. But it didn’t. Until finally the Covid-19 pandemic arrived alongside and, within a subject of months, (and in some cases, times), we vastly accelerated the speed of adoption of telemedicine and telehealth. 

What stopped health care procedures and health programs from adapting digital well being tools quicker? In lots of scenarios, it was the mistaken perception that the tempo of change in health care has to be slow. At times leaders assume individuals won’t adapt perfectly to modify. Other times, they feel clinicians and other providers can’t implement huge changes quickly. But as we figured out from the swift development of telemedicine all through the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, sufferers and clinicians alike can adapt speedily. So instead of placing every single superior concept by way of an unlimited barrage of pilots and studies, let’s rather put them into adoption appropriate away and

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How to Change up Your Workout Routine for Fall

Even if you’re not shuttling kids back to school or in a climate where autumn brings changing leaves and dropping temperatures, there tends to be a shift in our schedules and moods that comes with the start of fall, says Minneapolis-based Lindsay Ogden, a National Academy of Sports Medicine–certified personal trainer and the digital manager for content and coaching at for Life Time, a national fitness company that runs gyms and corporate wellness programs.

Fewer hours of daylight might find you spending less time outdoors, especially in the evenings or early morning hours. You might find yourself less motivated to stick with an outdoor workout, particularly if you had been exercising at one of these times, Ogden says. “Maybe it’s now dark when you get up.”

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Some people find themselves more energized to work out at new times throughout the day, she says. Or you might find yourself craving new ways to work out altogether. That “fresh start” feeling that comes with trying new activities can be really motivating, says Ogden.

The novelty can make it playful and fun — and something you look forward to rather than something you feel like you have to slog through.

Here are a few ideas of activities to try that can help you fit in lots of movement and embrace the change of season:

1. Apple Picking

Fall offers lots of outdoor activities to help you get a few extra steps in, from apple picking to navigating a corn maze to hiking or cycling.

Activities like these can up overall activity throughout the day and offer short bursts of intensity, says Ogden. For example, apple picking requires overhead stretching, as well as twists and forward bends (all good for maintaining mobility). A corn maze might inspire you to sprint through in a race with your friends and family.

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Getting different types of motion than you’d find in the gym can improve fitness overall, Ogden explains, since you’re using multiple muscle groups. Plus, she adds that being outdoors can give you an additional mental health boost.

“Wherever you are, think about ways to enjoy the season and truly embrace it,” Ogden suggests. Enjoying movement will make it feel less like work.

2. Fun Runs

Fall is definitely “fun run” season, says Ogden. For instance, many cities have a turkey trot run either on Thanksgiving or the weekend after. Other fun runs have themes — like a color run, where you jog through clouds of nontoxic colored powders, or a leaf run, where you run through a tree-lined course resplendent in autumn colors — and encourage participants to dress up in costumes or festive attire, Ogden says. Many of these races have a less intimidating 5K or other shorter distance option, or allow you to walk the route. Music, post-event celebrations, and the company of others offer a party-like

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