U.S. Dental Services Market 2022: Forecast & Market Share Analysis Examines the $50 Billion Market

DUBLIN, May 09, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Dental Services Market Research Report by Services Type (Cosmetic Dentistry, Dental Implants, and Dentures), End User, State – United States Forecast to 2027 – Cumulative Impact of COVID-19” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The United States Dental Services Market size was estimated at USD 47.16 billion in 2021, USD 50.42 billion in 2022, and is projected to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7.32% to reach USD 72.09 billion by 2027.

Market Statistics:

The report provides market sizing and forecast across five major currencies – USD, EUR, JPY, GBP, AUD, CAD, and CHF. It helps organization leaders make better decisions when currency exchange data is readily available. In this report, the years 2019 and 2020 are considered historical years, 2021 as the base year, 2022 as the estimated year, and years from 2023 to 2027 are considered the forecast period.

Market Segmentation & Coverage:

This research report categorizes the Dental Services to forecast the revenues and analyze the trends in each of the following sub-markets:

  • Based on Services Type, the market was studied across Cosmetic Dentistry, Dental Implants, Dentures, Laser Dentistry, Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Orthodontics, Periodontics, Root Canal or Endodontics, and Smile Makeover.

  • Based on End User, the market was studied across Dental Clinics and Hospitals.

  • Based on State, the market was studied across California, Florida, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Texas.

Cumulative Impact of COVID-19:

COVID-19 is an incomparable global public health emergency that has affected almost every industry, and the long-term effects are projected to impact the industry growth during the forecast period. Our ongoing research amplifies our research framework to ensure the inclusion of underlying COVID-19 issues and potential paths forward. The report delivers insights on COVID-19 considering the changes in consumer behavior and demand, purchasing patterns, re-routing of the supply chain, dynamics of current market forces, and the significant interventions of governments. The updated study provides insights, analysis, estimations, and forecasts, considering the COVID-19 impact on the market.

Competitive Strategic Window:

The Competitive Strategic Window analyses the competitive landscape in terms of markets, applications, and geographies to help the vendor define an alignment or fit between their capabilities and opportunities for future growth prospects. It describes the optimal or favorable fit for the vendors to adopt successive merger and acquisition strategies, geography expansion, research & development, and new product introduction strategies to execute further business expansion and growth during a forecast period.

FPNV Positioning Matrix:

The FPNV Positioning Matrix evaluates and categorizes the vendors in the Dental Services Market based on Business Strategy (Business Growth, Industry Coverage, Financial Viability, and Channel Support) and Product Satisfaction (Value for Money, Ease of Use, Product Features, and Customer Support) that aids businesses in better decision making and understanding the competitive landscape.

Market Share Analysis:

The Market Share Analysis offers the analysis of vendors considering their contribution to the overall market. It provides the idea of its revenue generation into the overall market

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New podcast examines wellness trends and beliefs, like what weight means about health : NPR

NPR’s Sarah McCammon talks with Maintenance Phase hosts Michael Hobbes and Aubrey Gordon on going where most health and fitness podcasts don’t, assessing popular dietary advice and wellness trends.



SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Every year, millions of Americans go on a diet. Americans also spend billions of dollars on weight loss products. So why, despite all of that, are obesity rates in the U.S. are continuing to rise?

AUBREY GORDON: It’s an incredibly complex issue that we don’t actually have answers for, but we continue to sort of use the rising rates of fatness in our culture as a cudgel to get folks to lose weight.

MCCAMMON: That’s writer Aubrey Gordon. She co-hosts the podcast “Maintenance Phase” with journalist Michael Hobbes. And she says when they first started, they wanted to focus on big questions. That other health and fitness podcasts weren’t necessarily asking

GORDON: Felt worth having a conversation about, like, OK, well, what’s actually the science behind this? What are the motives of the people who are presenting all of these fad diets, all of these wellness trends? Like, what’s the story behind it?

MCCAMMON: I spoke with Aubrey Gordon and Michael Hobbes the other day, and we started by talking about the medical consensus that obesity can lead to health problems.

GORDON: Yeah, there’s a very clear correlation between weight and bad health outcomes, but weight is not the only thing that’s correlated with health. We know that poverty has a devastating effect on people’s health. The life expectancy in various counties in America can be up to 20 years of difference. The poorest, most marginalized counties in America, people live to about 65. And, like, I think it’s, like, Boulder, Colo., or something, they live until they’re 85. There’s all these other health disparities that sort of we accept as correlations.

And yet, weirdly, when it comes to obesity, it’s like, oh, no, no, we know that the obesity is causing this, right? Like, people have kind of jumped to this causal explanation. And there is a very strong association, but there’s very strong associations of all kinds of things with health outcomes. So the question is, why are we still putting weight at the center of our understanding about health when there’s actually much more sophisticated ways to help people be healthy and we’re not really doing those?

MCCAMMON: You spend an episode looking at how obesity became defined not just as a risk factor for certain diseases, but eventually as a disease in and of itself. Can you just give us a nutshell version of how this happened?

GORDON: I mean, I think in order to talk about, quote-unquote, “obesity as a disease,” you’ve got to talk about the BMI, which I think we think of now as a hard and fast measure and an objective measure of size and health. The first BMI sort of public policy definition of overweight in the U.S. was that the fattest 15% of us should be considered overweight.

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