A new study reveals the importance of vitamin D on heart health

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Vitamin D status may help assess cardiovascular risk. Cyndi Monaghan/Getty Images
  • Vitamin D, also known as the “sunshine” vitamin, is a fat-soluble vitamin that exists in two main forms: D-2 and D-3.
  • As an essential micronutrient and one that is primarily derived from sunlight, vitamin D is important for the development of bones and teeth and the regular functioning of the immune system.
  • Beyond these functions, previous studies suggest an association between low vitamin D levels and a higher likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease.
  • In a new study, researchers have established that it is worthwhile to check vitamin D levels when assessing a person’s cardiovascular risk.

Worldwide, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are one of the leading causes of death. Every year, an estimated 17.9 million people around the world die as a result of complications from heart diseases. For context, this means that CVDs are responsible for 32% of all deaths globally.

Prior studies show that various factors — such as several health conditions, age, family history, diet, and lifestyle — combine to influence the risk of developing CVD.

Using a novel analytical approach, researchers in Australia have discovered an additional factor that may increase a person’s likelihood of CVD.

Lead author Prof. Elina Hyppönen, director of the Australian Centre for Precision Health at the University of South Australia Cancer Research Institute, outlined the results of the study for Medical News Today,

“We found evidence that vitamin D deficiency can increase blood pressure and the risk of CVD.”

“However,” she added, “increasing vitamin D concentrations will only be helpful for those participants who ‘need it,’ and further benefits from elevating concentrations beyond the nutritional requirement are going to be modest, if they exist.”

The results from the study appear in the European Heart Journal.

In the recent study, the researchers set out to investigate whether there is a relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, or 25(OH)D, and the risk of developing CVD.

Serum 25(OH)D levels are an established marker for vitamin D status.

To test their hypothesis, the researchers employed a specific analytical method to analyze data from UK Biobank — a large prospective cohort study of the United Kingdom’s population aged 37–73 years.

The participants were recruited from 22 assessment centers across the U.K. between March 13, 2006, and October 1, 2009. They filled out questionnaires providing broad information on health and lifestyle at baseline and provided blood samples for biomarker and genetic assays.

For the study, the research team limited data analyses to unrelated individuals who were identified as white British based on self-report and genetic profiling. Additionally, the team excluded participants with mismatched information between self-reported and genetic sex.

After filtering, the research team conducted genetic assays among individuals with complete information on 25(OH)D concentrations. As a safety measure, they also collected variables — including age, sex, and time of sample collection — that could affect serum 25(OH)D measurements.

The scientists collected this information from up to 295,788 participants.

The researchers compared the

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AHA Information: Her Ideal Pal Died Quickly at 31. Now, She Spreads the Phrase About Heart Health and fitness. | Wellbeing Information

By American Heart Affiliation Information, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Dec. 20, 2021 (American Heart Affiliation Information) — On a steamy July afternoon in Fort Scott, Kansas, 16-calendar year-previous Lindsey Lewis, dressed in a swimsuit and shorts and driving her very well-beloved convertible, picked up her friend Jill Overstake. They stopped for sodas on their way to the area rock quarry. A group of pals they referred to as “the boys” ended up leaping off the rocks into the water.

The moment there, Lindsey gave her close friend a appear that implied, “Shall we?”

“Totally not,” Jill mentioned. “It truly is not safe and sound.”

Lindsey smacked Jill on the shoulder playfully, as she generally did, and mentioned, “We’re executing it!”

She grabbed Jill by the hand and in they went, splashing into the murky h2o 25 ft or so down below. They laughed as they acquired out, their lengthy hair dripping, the solar warm on their skin.

“In hindsight, it summed up our marriage, Lindsey pulling me by the hand and having me out of my comfort zone,” remembers her good friend, who is now 34 and goes by Jillian Forsberg.

Jillian shared that joyous memory at Lindsey’s funeral.

In 2018, her childhood good friend, “L3” for Lindsey Louise Lewis, died quickly from an aortic dissection. A tear in the wall of her heart’s aorta allowed blood to rush amongst the wall’s levels.

Lindsey was 31, an energetic, bold attorney performing in Dallas who had just acquired her very first house with her boyfriend. She collapsed just after function even though exiting an elevator into the parking garage and died on the scene.

Jillian, who life in Wichita, Kansas, discovered of her friend’s death the future working day, when she woke up to screenfuls of texts and messages on her mobile phone.

The women satisfied in center faculty and bonded around sensation diverse, jointly. Lindsey was a bridesmaid at Jillian’s wedding and built a surprise visual appeal at her child shower. They retained up by way of texts and photographs. Jillian experienced admired Lindsey’s bravery, compassion and zest for everyday living.

In her shock and grief, Jillian dug deep into exploring heart disease, wanting to know if everything could have saved her buddy.

Most people who have aortic dissection say they truly feel a unexpected ripping or stabbing upper body ache that often spreads to the back. It can likely be taken care of with surgical procedure and treatment.

Lindsey’s boyfriend mentioned she had complained of some chest pains but had chalked them up to anxiety and stress and anxiety.

“If she could have noticed a cardiologist in her final couple of months, she might have experienced a lifesaving operation,” reported Jillian, who accepts that she will under no circumstances know.

Jillian also thought, if this can occur to my mate, it can materialize to me.

Inside weeks of Lindsey’s demise, Jillian started off to physical exercise on a regular basis for the very first time in her lifetime. She

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Falling asleep at this time may be safest for your heart, new study shows

The time you go to mattress could impact your chance for heart disorder. In reality, scientists say, there is a heart wellbeing sweet location for falling asleep: from 10 to 11 p.m.

An investigation of knowledge from additional than 88,000 older people tracked for around six decades exposed a 12 percent higher risk between those people who dropped off from 11 to 11:59 p.m. and a 25 per cent bigger hazard of producing cardiovascular ailment among the persons who fell asleep at midnight or later on. Slipping asleep before than 10 p.m. was affiliated with a 24 per cent maximize in risk, according to a report revealed Monday in the European Heart Journal—Digital Overall health.

“The overall body has a 24-hour inside clock, termed circadian rhythm, that assists regulate physical and mental performing,” neuroscientist David Strategies, co-writer of the examine and head of study at Huma, a London well being tech company that supports decentralized scientific trials, claimed in a assertion.

“While we can not conclude causation from our study, the effects propose that early or late bedtimes could be a lot more likely to disrupt the physique clock, with adverse repercussions for cardiovascular overall health,” mentioned Options, who is also a senior lecturer in organizational neuroscience at the College of Exeter in the U.K. Huma typically clears its reports by means of the ethics committee at the College of Exeter.  

To explore how diverse bedtimes may well affect coronary heart health and fitness, Strategies and colleagues at Huma, turned to United kingdom Biobank, a biomedical databases. United kingdom Biobank maintains data about extra than 500,000 volunteers ages 37 to 73 who were recruited from 2006 to 2010 and delivered Huma researchers information about their demographics, life and health. Their bodily health and fitness was also assessed.

The researchers centered on 88,926 grownups, typical age 61, who wore accelerometers (units that history when a person moves) on their wrists for seven days. With the accelerometer information, the scientists identified the occasions of slumber onset and waking.

For the duration of an normal adhere to-up period of 5.7 many years, 3,172 of the volunteers (3.6 per cent) professional cardiovascular situations, this sort of as strokes, coronary heart assaults or heart failure — incidents were being best among men and women with slumber situations at midnight or later on and most affordable between all those who fell asleep from 10 to 10:59 p.m.

Even when a selection of components have been taken into account — together with age, gender, snooze length, slumber irregularity, staying an early chicken or a night owl, cigarette smoking standing, body-mass index, diabetes, blood tension, cholesterol degrees and socioeconomic standing — falling asleep regularly at midnight or later was continue to connected to the best increased possibility of heart sickness.

The amplified risk was much more pronounced in women of all ages who fell asleep later on. Adult males had been at larger coronary heart possibility only when they fell asleep previously in the evening, right before 10

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Heart healthy eating starts with your habits, statement says

That doesn’t mean giving up takeout or that five-minute meal kit from the grocery store altogether. The dietary guidance encourages people to adapt these habits into their lifestyle.

The statement identifies 10 features of heart-healthy eating patterns — including guidance to combine a balanced diet with exercise; consume most nutrients through food over supplements; eat whole grains; reduce sodium, added sugar and alcohol intake; use non-tropical plant oils; and eat minimally processed, over ultra-processed, foods.

“What’s really important now is that people make modifications that can be sustainable in the long term,” said Alice Lichtenstein, director of Tufts University’s Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory and chair of the writing group for the AHA’s new statement.

The statement’s writing group evaluated literature and devised 10 features of heart-healthy dietary patterns. The group also expanded on the guidance, recognizing the need for sustainability and societal challenges that can be obstacles to achieving proper nutrition.

Lichtenstein said eating behaviors have changed since the AHA last published a statement with dietary guidance 15 years ago. Previously, the main options were to eat out or dine in, but eating habits have been less consistent in recent years. There has been a trend — exacerbated by the pandemic — of more convenience food options, such as delivery, meal kits and premade meals.

Make changes that go the distance

The focus of the AHA’s new guidance, Lichtenstein said, is to do what works for you, whatever dietary restrictions or cultural adaptions you want to make. Lichtenstein discourages people from making drastic changes based on fad diets — instead, sustained efforts in incorporating these healthy habits can be more beneficial in the long run.

Lauri Wright, chair of the department of nutrition and dietetics at the University of North Florida and national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, seconds this long-term mindset. Wright, who was not involved with the AHA’s statement, emphasized the focus on building lifestyle habits, regardless of people’s ages and backgrounds.

“When we’re talking pattern or a lifestyle, we’re not just talking about a diet — something temporary,” Wright said. “This is really a lifestyle, and it really can accommodate all of your individualities.”

A heart-healthy way of eating can have other benefits, the statement said, fostering more sustainable practices for the environment. This year is the first time the AHA guidance has included sustainability. Lichtenstein said there is still room for research about plant-based alternatives, such as vegan animal products, which are not always the healthier options. But generally, consuming more whole foods and fewer animal products can benefit both your health and the environment.

The statement also recognizes societal challenges for the first time, such as food insecurity, diet misinformation and structural racism, which can all affect a person’s diet and access to food. A 2020 Northwestern University study found Black and Hispanic households are at greater risk for experiencing food insecurity.

Tackle 1 adjustment at a time

More comprehensive food education from an early age can also instill lifelong healthy eating

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