Delta Dental of Oklahoma Foundation celebrates Countrywide Children’s Dental Health Month with free of charge means for educators and mothers and fathers

OKLAHOMA (Feb. 8, 2022) – Delta Dental of Oklahoma Basis is celebrating Countrywide Children’s Dental Health and fitness Month this February by delivering free of charge assets to Oklahoma parents and educators. As the top supplier of dental well being and education and learning-associated initiatives in the point out, the Foundation gives Captain Supertooth class visits and MouthScience experiments geared toward training little ones the importance of oral wellbeing treatment.

Tooth decay is the most frequent long-term childhood infectious condition in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Command and Avoidance. Furthermore, an oral health report card from the Oklahoma Oral Health Coalition uncovered about 66 per cent of third graders have handled or untreated tooth decay.

Untreated tooth decay typically outcomes in persistent discomfort, incapability to try to eat easily or chew nicely, embarrassment at discolored and ruined enamel, and distraction from taking part in and mastering. By learning to brush, floss, and make balanced meals and consume choices, kids can avoid aid prevent agony and the need for additional expensive dental methods.

“Fostering fantastic oral cleanliness practices in our state’s youth is critically crucial,” reported Delta Dental of Oklahoma Foundation Director Terrisa Singleton. “Our Captain Supertooth and MouthScience programs interact small children as a result of immersive finding out activities and enable them obtain and knowledge of how they can get cost of their possess oral wellness.”

Captain Supertooth travels all more than Oklahoma teaching small children how to keep their tooth joyful, nutritious and clear. The Captain Supertooth method is out there to Oklahoma Pre-K as a result of third grade college students, and the stop by can take position in-man or woman or practically. Captain Supertooth delivers on line methods like brush charts, oral well being quizzes and extra. To understand a lot more and to book a free go to, please check out CaptainSupertooth. com.

MouthScience is an engaging and palms-on experiment that demonstrates the degrees of acid and sugar contained in frequent beverages. The target of the system is to inspire students to make healthier meals and consume choices, reduce the probability of acquiring cavities and enhancing gum health and fitness. Mouth-Science kits are available no cost of cost for use in third as a result of sixth grade school rooms in Oklahoma. Every kit is made up of all materials desired for a course of up to 30 students. Kits can be asked for at DDOKFoundation.org/ MouthScience.

To find out far more about Delta Dental of Oklahoma Basis and its applications pay a visit to DDOKFoundation.org.

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New clinic to present affordable dental care in northeast Oklahoma

TULSA, Okla. (KFOR) – A new clinic at an Oklahoma college that will open afterwards year will soon be aiding Oklahomans in have to have of economical dental treatment.

Earlier this week, the University of Oklahoma declared a $2 million gift from Delta Dental of Oklahoma and Delta Dental of Oklahoma Foundation to the OU College of Dentistry.

The gift will fund a dental clinic on the OU-Tulsa campus.

“This extraordinary reward from Delta Dental of Oklahoma and its Foundation strengthens our shared commitment to elevating the in general health and fitness of our point out – an ambition that will be understood via this new dental clinic,” mentioned OU President Joseph Harroz Jr. “For additional than 50 many years, the OU Higher education of Dentistry has offered important dental services to Oklahomans, and this new clinic will grow this custom to the northeastern corner of our point out. We are deeply grateful to Delta Dental for getting similarly devoted to escalating obtain to large-quality dental treatment to additional Oklahomans in what will develop into a major-tier learning setting for our dental pupils.”

Officials say the OU College of Dentistry Delta Dental of Oklahoma In depth Treatment Clinic will allow learners to offer dental treatment to group customers in have to have.

Care will be delivered by 3rd- and fourth-year dental college students less than the supervision of licensed dental college associates.

More than the final five years, the OU College or university of Dentistry at the OU Health and fitness Sciences Heart in Oklahoma Town has offered dental and unexpected emergency treatment to a lot more than 285,000 people. Professionals say almost 25% of all those individuals traveled from the northeastern component of the condition for cure.

“As the state’s only not-for-revenue dental rewards company, Delta Dental of Oklahoma is very pleased to stand with the University of Oklahoma at the forefront of dental instruction and treatment method,” said John Gladden, president and chief government officer of Delta Dental of Oklahoma. “The OU School of Dentistry is an a must have associate in aiding Delta Dental of Oklahoma fulfill its not-for-income mission to make improvements to the oral wellness of all Oklahomans.”

The clinic is anticipated to open later on this summer months.

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A Tale of Two Medicaid Expansions: Oklahoma Jumps In, While Missouri Lags

Temp worker James Dickerson applied for Medicaid because it will be cheaper than his current health plan. Home health aide Sharon Coleman looks forward to having coverage that will cover a hospital stay. Incoming medical student Danielle Gaddis no longer worries a trip to the doctor will leave her in debt.

All three are among the roughly 490,000 people newly eligible for Medicaid after Oklahoma and Missouri voters in 2020 approved expanding the federal-state public health insurance program for people with low incomes. In both states, people who earn up to 138% of the federal poverty level — about $18,000 per year for an individual — can now get the free coverage even if they don’t have disabilities.

But the experience of the newly eligible in those two states — an estimated 215,000 people in Oklahoma and 275,000 in Missouri — has differed dramatically. Oklahoma has enrolled over 210,000 people, while Missouri has enrolled fewer than 20,000.

The difference comes down to the approaches taken by the two states, both of which are Republican-led and resisted expanding Medicaid for years.

Once Oklahoma voters approved the expansion, it was quickly embraced: The legislature appropriated $164 million in the state budget to fund it. Applications opened this June, one month before the program began, and within a month, 113,000 people had been approved.

In August, Oklahoma Secretary of Health and Mental Health Kevin Corbett told state lawmakers about one of those enrollees: a 62-year-old woman able to schedule appointments with a doctor and dentist for the first time in 20 years.

“Truly life-changing,” Corbett said. “We feel very good about what we’re being able to do.”

Other states that expanded Medicaid in recent years saw enrollment swell in the first month. Louisiana’s combined Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program rolls grew by over 255,000; Virginia’s increased by almost 184,000; Idaho added about 45,500 enrollees, roughly half of the anticipated number of newly eligible people; and Montana added over 23,000, 51% of its expected total. Missouri, on the other hand, has enrolled only about 7% of newly eligible people in Medicaid.

“You can expand Medicaid on the books, but there are a lot of ways that you can throw up barriers to keep people from getting enrolled,” said Sidney Watson, director of the Center for Health Law Studies at Saint Louis University.

Expansion has been a slog in Missouri. The legislature refused to fund the voter-approved program, prompting Republican Gov. Mike Parson to announce in May that the state would “withdraw” its expansion plan. Then, in August, a judge ordered the state to start accepting applications, which it did. But Missouri could not begin processing them until Oct. 1.

That whiplash means many newly qualified Missourians are likely unaware they could be covered by Medicaid, according to University of Missouri-Kansas City law professor Ann Marie Marciarille.

Marciarille said that the state has a responsibility to get the word out about the program and that Missouri has done little more

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