Pasadena, Extended Beach wellbeing officers say no to indoor mask mandate proposal

Los Angeles County’s health and fitness director claimed Tuesday COVID-19 case numbers, hospitalizations and fatalities continue on to display indications of stabilizing regionally, which signifies the county may possibly pause options to reimpose a universal indoor mask-donning mandate afterwards this week.

Tuesday evening the Metropolis of Prolonged Seaside and Pasadena, which the two have health departments different from the LA County Division of Wellbeing, claimed there would not be enforcement of a mask mandate if it were being to come again.

“Pasadena Community Wellbeing Department has established that jurisdictional COVID-19 confirmed circumstance fees have declined for about 10 times, and area hospitalization metrics have not continued to enhance throughout that time,” health and fitness officers from Pasadena produced in a assertion. “The City of Pasadena overall health officer will not be issuing a typical indoor mask mandate at this time.” 

Well being officials with the Metropolis of Extensive Beach introduced a very similar assertion, declaring, in section: 

Even with soaring situations, hospitalizations amid Extended Beach front residents continue to be steady, area hospitals have ample capability and fatalities keep on being reduced. As a result, concerning masking, the Town of Lengthy Seashore will proceed to align with the California Department of Community Health (CDPH), which strongly urges, but does not require, masking in most situation.

Talking to the Board of Supervisors, Public Wellness Director Barbara Ferrer stated she was “relieved” to report a ongoing drop in the normal daily amount of new infections being claimed, with the past 7 days viewing approximately 6,100 new instances day-to-day, down from 6,700 the former week.

The change of ideas will come following the Beverly Hills City Council Monday night time unanimously voted not to uphold the mandate, should really it be imposed again. 

Ferrar also pointed out a stabilization in virus-relevant hospitalizations and fatalities, with an ordinary of 14 fatalities per working day currently being noted — a quantity that she stressed continues to be too substantial.

But she claimed that, supplied the continuous declines that have been recorded in virus metrics over the previous 7 days and a 50 percent, “We could be positioned to pause the implementation of common masking.” This sort of a resolve will not be built right until Thursday, when up-to-date clinic admission fees are produced.

Ferrer reported before a new indoor mask mandate would be imposed on Friday if the county remains in the “large” virus activity group — with a new day-to-day virus-linked clinic admission fee greater than 10 per 100,000 inhabitants. That range as of final Thursday was 11.7 per 100,000.

Ferrer explained Tuesday that if the county is at the very least approaching the 10 for each 100,000 people degree by Thursday, it would “bring about a reassessment on the will need to reimplement an indoor masking mandate.”

She stressed through her presentation, having said that, that transmission of COVID-19 remains high across the county, and the virus is still a top bring about of demise, killing additional folks in the to start with

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Could California’s single-payer proposal reignite debate on health care reform?

Earlier this month, a California assembly committee approved two measures to overhaul the state’s health care system and provide coverage to all residents free of charge.

Assembly Bill 1400 would set up “CalCare,” a state-run, statewide system, and Assembly Constitutional Amendment 11 would change the state’s tax code to pay for it through a voter referendum.

The fate of the legislation, which would establish a taxpayer-funded system similar to those in the United Kingdom, Canada and Japan, is likely to be closely watched by policymakers in other states and the federal government as consumers in the country deal with ballooning costs and millions of uninsured people.

A single-payer system at the national level was a topic of debate among Democratic presidential candidates in 2020 and support for the idea has increased in recent years.

“California is a big, diverse place. If you can make it work here, you can make it work anywhere,” Jack Needleman, chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health, told ABC News.

State leaders on both sides of the aisle, including Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, have supported single payer in theory, they haven’t pledged full support for these new bills.

And if the plan does pass, it would require significant tax changes that can only be authorized by a voter referendum, showing up on a ballot in 2024 at the earliest.

Even if an outcome isn’t reached in the near future, public health experts said the debate could lead to similar bills that close the gap for uninsured Californians.

High interest despite previous failures

This isn’t the first time that a state has attempted a single-payer plan, where all health insurance offerings would be government-administered and available to all.

Vermont enacted a single-payer system in 2011, but it was dissolved three years later because of rising costs and lagging tax revenue. Colorado and Massachusetts also attempted to create a single-payer system, through a voter referendum and state bills, respectively, but neither passed.

Like other states, California is trying to resolve its costly problem of uninsured residents, according to public health experts. A study released last year by the UC Berkeley Labor Center and UCLA Center for Health Policy Research found that 3.2 million Californians, 9.5% of the state’s population, likely would remain uninsured in 2022.

John McDonough, a professor of health policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, told ABC News that the push for state single-payer programs cooled following Vermont’s failure, but interest from California lawmakers has remained strong even after multiple attempts fizzled.

In 1994, California voters rejected a ballot proposal that would have created a state single-payer system. In 2017, a bill establishing a single-payer system passed in the California state Senate but didn’t get a vote in the assembly

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