COVID counselor solutions pandemic issues: unvaccinated dentist

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A vial of the COVID-19 vaccine.

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Welcome to this week’s installment of the COVID Counselor, in which we tackle your pandemic challenges with thoughtfulness and occasional snark. Let us pull on some surgical gloves and verify the aged mailbag.

Between Christmas and New Year’s, I went to my dentist’s place of work right after I little bit down on some tricky sweet. When I questioned if the place of work had been vaccinated, the technician explained they were not demanded mainly because they have been not significant sufficient. I then quickly asked if they have been being tested on a common basis. She explained they were not. I mumbled one thing to the result that they should really be because they were being a healthcare facility. How ought to I deal with this? Need to I give them a undesirable ranking on social media? Should really I publish a letter to the proprietor and complain? Or should I just modify dentists?

— P.D. in Raleigh

Lord is aware producing a horrible Yelp assessment feels like throwing a lightning bolt of propriety. But if you are like me, individuals unfavorable assessments commence to come to feel petty soon after about 30 seconds, and you start off Googling strategies to unpublish.

So let us try one thing else. For qualified backup, I have referred to as in my own dentist: Dr. Cheryl Siegel, who receives an endorsement from both of those my tooth and pandemic peace of head.

Dr. Siegel when used an unvaccinated personnel herself. At the time this staff obtained hired, she was not inquiring the concern. And in the earlier days of the pandemic, this employee presented a bunch of good reasons for steering distinct of the needle.

But then a affected person asked, and the personnel unveiled her unvaxxed standing. After the personnel did that, the individual remaining a lousy on the net overview about “Typhoid Terry,” and Dr. Siegel had to allow this human being go. Most people in her place of work is now totally vaxxed — a requirement in her workplace.

But here’s the point.

The American Dental Association endorses vaccinations, but it does not need them. You can use an unvaccinated dental technician. But OSHA legal guidelines keep businesses from telling any individual who is vaxxed on workers and who isn’t. And if a individual asks the technician directly, no respond to is necessary.

“If they are a very good particular person,” Siegel stated, “they’d explain to you.”

Here’s her resolution.

If you truly feel uncomfortable, check with to be rescheduled. Say you want only vaccinated hands in your mouth. Yet again, her business is vaccinated-up, but if it have been a difficulty on that working day, she could join you with the proper human being without getting to spill anybody’s healthcare techniques.

What ever you do — and I’m conversing to you squeamish out there — really don’t use the pandemic as an justification for keeping away from the

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Live updates: Ecuador makes pandemic vaccination mandatory | Health & Fitness

QUITO, Ecuador — Ecuador is making vaccination against the coronavirus mandatory.

The government said Thursday that only Ecuadorians with a medical condition that could be complicated by vaccination will be exempt. Those people must provide documentation.

Officials say the order comes because of an increase in coronavirus infections and the circulation of new variants such as omicron.

Ecuador says it has enough vaccine to immunize the entire population. As of Tuesday, about 77% of Ecuador’s 17.3 million people had been vaccinated. About 33,600 people in Ecuador have died from COVID-19.

Earlier this week, the body overseeing health policies to combat the pandemic decreed that vaccination certificates must be shown to enter restaurants, cinemas and other public areas.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TODAY ABOUT THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC:

— Ever-morphing coronavirus requires holiday calculus for 2nd winter

People are also reading…

Omicron less likely to put you in the hospital, British studies say

— US Supreme Court to hold special session on worker vaccine requirements

Go to https://APNews.com/coronavirus-pandemic for updates throughout the day.

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING TODAY:

SANTIAGO, Chile — Chile plans to offer a fourth dose of the coronavirus vaccine to its citizens.

President Sebastián Piñera said Thursday that the fourth dose is expected to start in February.

Health Secretary Enrique París says the shot will be different than the one people got previously.

Chile has reported almost 86% of its population fully vaccinated. That makes it the country with the highest level of immunization against the coronavirus in Latin America, and puts it among the best ones in the world, according to online research website Our World in Data.

Piñera says 10,2 million out of Chile’s 19 million people have received a third dose as a booster.

Almost 39,000 people in Chile are confirmed to have died from COVID-19.

RALEIGH, N.C. — The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services says that although its testing supply chain “remains tight,” the uptick in demand since Thanksgiving has not reached the levels the state saw in past peaks, such as the delta surge during the summer.

The agency said Thursday that it “is working with laboratory partners to continuously assess testing demand and supply throughout the state and at this time most laboratories have additional testing capacity available.”

Health officials in the state’s Wake County announced Wednesday night that they will double the number of appointments and expand rapid testing at five locations. They say results for 13,000 people each day will come back in less than 12 hours.

MADRID — Spain has set a new daily infection record as citizens seeking to determine whether they are contagious ahead of Christmas gatherings endured long queues amid a shortage of tests.

The nearly 73,000 new cases recorded Thursday were Spain’s third consecutive record high in three days.

The national 14-day contagion rate rose to its highest level this year: 911 new cases per 100,000 residents.

The Spanish government has ordered mandatory mask-wearing

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Pandemic poses short- and long-term risks to babies, especially boys

The pandemic has created a hostile environment for pregnant people and their babies.

Stress levels among expectant mothers have soared. Pregnant women with Covid are five times as likely as uninfected pregnant people to require intensive care and 22 times as likely to die. Infected moms are four times as likely to have a stillborn child.

Yet some of the pandemic’s greatest threats to infants’ health may not be apparent for years or even decades.

Full coverage of the Covid-19 pandemic

That’s because babies of Covid-infected moms are 60 percent more likely to be born very prematurely, which increases the danger of infant mortality and long-term disabilities such as cerebral palsy, asthma and hearing loss, as well as a child’s risk of adult disease, including depression, anxiety, heart disease and kidney disease.

Studies have linked fever and infection during pregnancy to developmental and psychiatric conditions such as autism, depression and schizophrenia.

“Some of these conditions do not show up until middle childhood or early adult life, but they have their origins in fetal life,” said Dr. Evdokia Anagnostou, a neurologist and pediatrics professor at the University of Toronto.

For fetuses exposed to Covid, the greatest danger is usually not the coronavirus itself, but the mother’s immune system.

Both severe Covid infections and the strain of the pandemic can expose fetuses to harmful inflammation, which can occur when a mother’s immune system is fighting a virus or when stress hormones send nonstop alarm signals.

Prenatal inflammation “changes the way the brain develops and, depending on the timing of the infection, it can change the way the heart or kidneys develop,” Anagnostou said.

Although health officials have strongly recommended Covid vaccines for pregnant people, only 35 percent are fully vaccinated.

At least 150,000 pregnant people have been diagnosed with Covid; more than 25,000 of them have been hospitalized, and 249 have died, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Although most babies will be fine, even a small increase in the percentage of children with special medical or educational needs could have a large effect on the population, given the huge number of Covid infections, Anagnostou said.

“If someone has a baby who is doing well, that is what they should focus on,” Anagnostou said. “But from a public health point of view, we need to follow women who experienced severe Covid and their babies to understand the impact.”

Learning from history

Researchers in the United States and other countries are already studying “the Covid generation” to see whether these children have more health issues than those conceived or born before 2020.

Previous crises have shown that the challenges fetuses face in the womb — such as maternal infections, hunger, stress and hormone-disrupting chemicals — can leave a lasting imprint on their health, as well as that of their children and grandchildren, said Dr. Frederick Kaskel, director of pediatric nephrology at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore.

People whose

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Pandemic stress, cyberattacks are compounding degradation of care delivery

This past September, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency published a report designed to assess the health of the nation’s hospitals and health systems.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the report, “‘Provide Medical Care’ is in Critical Condition: Analysis and  Stakeholder Decision Support to Minimize Further Harm,” doesn’t offer encouraging news.

It finds the nationwide infrastructure enabling provision of medical care – one of CISA’s 55 national critical functions – severely strained by the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting clinical, financial, workforce and supply chain challenges.

The concurrent cyber-pandemic of rampant ransomware and nation-state skullduggery has only compounded the difficulties faced by providers.

As the report notes: “Beyond the obvious consequences of disruptions to diagnostic, testing and treatment equipment, even minor reductions in efficiency caused by cyber-incidents compound to increase staff workload and degrade the system’s ability to provide medical care.”

At the upcoming HIMSS Healthcare Cybersecurity Forum, which kicks off next Monday, a CISA researcher will unpack the recent report – and offer some suggestions for how his agency can support struggling healthcare organizations.

To preview his session, “Healthcare is in Critical Condition,” Josh Corman, who has long IT security and public policy experience in the private sector and joined CISA this past year under the CARES Act as a senior advisor and strategist, spoke with Healthcare IT News about the report and what it means.

“We do regular, routine analysis of risk to the nation’s critical infrastructure and national critical functions throughout the pandemic,” Corman explained, noting that the assessment is both qualitative and quantitative. “This analysis is done for government stakeholders and decision-support within CISA, DHS and across agencies like HHS and CDC.”

Like many of the 55 other national critical functions during this time of upheaval – they include operate government, generate electricity, provide wireless access network services and maintain access to medical records – the NCF known as provide medical care “has been severely strained, stressed at various points throughout the pandemic.”

Aimed at various stakeholders – hospital leaders, healthcare providers, cybersecurity and IT professionals – the report explores several matters that most who have experienced the past two years “suspected or possibly or probably thought were intuitive,” Corman said. “But now we’ve got some hard data to show the impacts that are affecting their organizations.”

The report explores several areas of stress and strains for providers. For instance, Corman explained, “We have the first data sizing of the relationship, the correlation between IC bed utilization and excess deaths two, four and six weeks later.”

“It’s a novel set of findings, and it’s much different than, say, pre-pandemic excess death rates by sizing the shape of that curve. We hope to make sure that people who are making choices about hospital utilization are armed with this newer consequence information.”

The strains on the care delivery system – and the excess deaths they cause – can have severe upstream effects on broader infrastructure, workforce and, potentially, national security.

“An analysis of

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‘A Hard Stop’: How Harvard’s Dental College Graduated Every single Scholar Despite a Pandemic Shutdown | News

In March 2020, the Harvard Faculty of Dental Medicine went completely remote all students were being despatched residence, and the Harvard Dental Clinic — exactly where pupils generally hone their expertise doing the job with clients — was shut down other than for crisis care.

“We went from a entire clinic and then to a tricky cease: 100 miles per hour to zero,” mentioned German O. Gallucci, chair of the restorative dentistry and biomaterials sciences office.

With the shutdown, 3rd- and fourth-calendar year dental learners — whose curriculum is based mostly on medical apply and working experience — were being reduce off from observing patients. Although fourth-yr college students had concluded most of their specifications, 3rd-12 months college students in the Course of 2021 faced the problem of conference their graduation and competency standards irrespective of lessened scientific availability, according to Sang E. Park, HSDM’s associate dean for dental schooling.

“I have to say that it was the most tough course — the Class of 2021 — that I had to be graduating on time in my 20 yrs of getting dental school,” Park said.

Inspite of this, just about every member of the Course of 2021 graduated on time or early, a feat the school’s dean, William V. Giannobile, credits to school customers likely earlier mentioned and outside of to aid students full their demands.

“What the faculty did is they ‘sacrificed’ their college observe time to open up up the clinics to the college students,” he explained in an Oct job interview. “And then they labored three evenings per 7 days, and also on Saturdays, to offer that schooling.”

Customers of the Course of 2021 mentioned in interviews they have been at first worried about the unexpected discontinuation of their clinical education, but impressed with how the faculty responded — 1st, by adapting its curriculum to on-line for the initially several months of the pandemic, and later slowly returning college students to medical exercise in man or woman.

“I’m so glad I went to a faculty like Harvard where, honestly, they cared so substantially about helping us graduate,” said Ashiana Jivraj, a 2021 HSDM graduate who was a third-12 months student when she was sent residence.

Russell H. Taylor, a lecturer in restorative dentistry and biomaterials sciences, acknowledged that furnishing distant instruction in a specifically fingers-on area this sort of as dentistry was tough.

“There’s a large amount of abilities that you need to have to observe and you will need to do underneath supervision when you’re setting up out, since it is a quite fingers-on and a very visible career, far too,” he reported. “There’s a lot of tactile, visible items that you just cannot just assign a looking through for, always.”

‘Solving a Big Puzzle’

Coming up with a digital curriculum that designed the greatest use of students’ and college members’ time, whilst making sure that college students could meet dental competency specifications for the duration of the shutdown, was “like solving a large puzzle,” according

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Vice President Harris Announces Historic Funding to Bolster Equitable Wellbeing Treatment During Pandemic, and Over and above

$1.5 Billion Expense in Countrywide Health Support Corps and Nurse Corps Will Extend and Diversify the Health and fitness Workforce and Improve Essential Clinical Care in Underserved Communities

Currently, Vice President Kamala Harris will announce a historic $1.5 billion financial investment to aid develop and diversify the nation’s well being treatment workforce, and bolster equitable wellbeing care in the communities that will need it most in the course of the COVID-19 pandemic and in the decades to appear.   

These awards are supporting the Countrywide Health and fitness Company Corps, Nurse Corps, and Compound Use Problem Procedure and Recovery packages. These programs address workforce shortages and wellbeing disparities by offering scholarship and loan reimbursement funding for overall health treatment pupils and experts, in trade for a services commitment in hard-strike and higher-hazard communities.   

Thanks to the American Rescue Strategy, this funding will assistance above 22,700 providers—the largest subject strength in record for these packages and a report quantity of competent medical practitioners, dentists, nurses, and behavioral wellbeing companies committed to working in underserved communities in the course of a second when we require them the most. 

Much more than 23.6 million people in the U.S. obtain care from National Wellbeing Assistance Corps and Nurse Corps clinicians. Throughout the pandemic, 1000’s of these wellbeing companies have served in group health and fitness facilities and hospitals throughout the place, caring for COVID-19 patients, supporting the psychological overall health of their communities, administering COVID-19 tests and lifesaving treatments, and placing pictures in arms.

Only about 7 per cent of physicians in the United States identify as Black or Hispanic/Latino despite the actuality that Black and Hispanic/Latino Americans account for 31 p.c of the nation’s complete inhabitants. Above 25 % of physicians serving through the Countrywide Overall health Assistance Corps discover as Black or Hispanic/Latino. The mobilization of these suppliers is a important move in the direction of addressing racial and ethnic disparities in wellbeing results and increasing the representation of these communities in health and fitness care professions.

Even more, the United States is projected to face a shortage of almost 60,000 principal treatment health professionals, dentists, and psychiatrists about the up coming ten years, and demands an estimated 158,000 new nurses to graduate every yr for the relaxation of the 10 years. A substantial barrier in assembly these well being care requires is the university student credit card debt related with graduate wellbeing schooling, which can common additional than $200,000 for each pupil and prevent students from underserved communities from even taking into consideration a job in health care professions. To further more assist the growth of most important treatment, the Administration also programs to start awarding $330 million in American Rescue System funding for Instructing Overall health Center Graduate Health-related Education. This further funding will more help the growth of the principal care medical professional and dental workforce in underserved communities through neighborhood-dependent key care residency courses in family members medicine, interior drugs, pediatrics, interior drugs-pediatrics, psychiatry, obstetrics and gynecology, normal dentistry,

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